Future Home of the Living God

Future Home of the Living God

A Novel

Book - 2017
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A tale set in a world of reversing evolution and a growing police state follows pregnant thirty-two-year-old Cedar Hawk Songmaker, who investigates her biological family while awaiting the birth of a child who may emerge as a member of a primitive human species.
Publisher: New York : HarperCollins Publishers, 2017
Edition: First edition
ISBN: 9780062694058
0062694057
Branch Call Number: FIC Erdrich L
Characteristics: 269 pages ; 24 cm

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m
mynovelesquelife
Jun 17, 2019

This weekend I finished two novels written by two authors I have been wanting to try for a long while.  Every time I read a synopsis to a Louise Erdrich's book, I want to (and often do) add it to my to-read shelf.  Her books sound so interesting and given all the accolades, they must be well-written.  I even asked to review Erdrich's latest book, Future Home of the Living God, from the publisher. I hadn't yet had time to download it to my Kindle, but when I was at the library on Saturday I saw that it was a 7-day loan, and grabbed it.  The book gods must want me to read it now. Who can deny the book gods?  And, amazingly I did start it Saturday and finished it late on Sunday afternoon.  

After reading a few of Tasha Alexander and Deanna Raybourn's historical/romantic mysteries, I kept seeing Lauren Willig's Pink Carnation series being recommend to me.  I liked the summary and added that to my list.  After a several books, Willig released a few standalone historical fiction.  When I saw her newest novel, The English Wife was a gothic mystery, I was down to read and review this.  I got my crap together and actually sent it to my kindle! I ended up giving both novels the same rating.  

RATING: 3.5 STARS
2017; Harper/HarperCollins Canada

I did not read the synopsis to this novel and just started in. A few chapters in I realize this is a dystopian novel. I don't read a lot of dystopia. I try to be cool and read them, but often I lose interest. Yet, The Handmaid's Tale (Margaret Atwood) is one that blew me away with each reading. So I kept a positive vibe, and I enjoyed this one. Erdrich is a great writer. I was hooked with the characters and to see where they would go. The story was intriguing (and scary af) but I kind of felt like I was lost in some parts. I think that was more because of the diary format or me, lol. I am looking forward to my next Erdrich novel!

***I received an eARC from EDELWEISS***

w
WoodneathKristie
Mar 25, 2019

Future Home paints a gripping picture of a society ravaged by climatological and sociological crisis. Moving back and forth between the banality of upper-middle class suburban Minneapolis and the unique pacing of daily reservation life in remote northern Minnesota, the story uses contrast to underscore how people struggle to adapt when the extraordinary becomes the ordinary. Future home is less of a statement, and more of a question, and is best enjoyed if read in that light.

Banks_SusanC Oct 23, 2018

This novel has lots of compelling, appealing characters. The plot is a little out there, and the ending is not what we've come to expect from these types of stories. But, all-in-all, the book is thought-provoking and entertaining.

k
kazizumi
Sep 01, 2018

I love Erdrich's writing and was eager to read this after reading "Roundhouse" which I thought was a wonderful story. I could not immerse myself in the plot of this book.

n
NFN
Jun 02, 2018

This is a very disappointing book, with lots of underdeveloped themes, boring asides, and unconvincing characters. Better to stick with Atwood's original and far superior version of American dystopia.

j
joycerlove
May 28, 2018

I enjoyed this book until the ending, which left me feeling like I had just wasted 3-4 hours of my life.

k
ksellgren
May 10, 2018

This could easily serve as a prequel to Margaret Atwood’s “The Handmaid’s Tale”. It shows how our country could become Atwood’s terrifying dystopia.

d
durksenary
May 03, 2018

At some point Erdrich or her editor decided, several decades ago, that the manuscript wasn't ready for publication. They were right at the time and should have left it alone or made an effort to fix the problems. It's almost as if the author was tired of the story or simply didn't know where it was going. It doesn't have to be a tidy or happy ending, but the book should have had an ending that didn't seem as if the writer had simply given up.

Having said that, there were interesting parts, including the underlying idea that evolution was somehow turning on itself or reverse engineering a new form of human being. That would have been an interesting idea to pursue a bit more.

And, I much prefer Erdrich's dystopian vision to Atwood's, Erdrich's writing to Atwood's. This one didn't have the preachy tone of Alias Grace. So, there's that!

b
BWilsoned
Apr 16, 2018

Wow! Erdrich knows how to write them, and this one is awesome. Cedar, part Ojibwe, adopted by crunchy hippies, finds her birth mother at a time when evolution, apparently, has stopped moving forward.
Pregnant women are imprisoned until they give birth so that healthy babies can be farmed out to other people. Of course, native women seem to be the ones able to produce healthy babies, so Cedar is on the run from the get-go.
Not a happy ending, so I was disappointed with that--I'm definitely a Pollyanna.

l
Lotushead
Apr 08, 2018

Louise paints a very frightening future.

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bluecocoa
Jul 28, 2018

bluecocoa thinks this title is suitable for 19 years and over

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anneholmquist
Dec 04, 2017

Postapocalyptic, women can't get pregnant or have enhanced (mutated) children,. Fertile women are held in prison until birth. Theocracy which keeps only "normal" children, which ar farmed out at birth. Indian woman with normal child in utero tells story to mbryo, then child is taken away.

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